Capability Search

Entry - Professionalism

Social workers are members of an internationally recognised profession, a title protected in UK law. Social workers demonstrate professional commitment by taking responsibility for their conduct, practice and learning, with support through supervision. As representatives of the social work profession they safeguard its reputation and are accountable to the professional regulator.

  • Demonstrates an initial understanding of the role of the social worker
  • Demonstrates motivation and commitment to qualify and practice as a social worker
  • Identifies own potential strengths and weaknesses in relation to the role of social worker
  • Demonstrates an initial understanding of the importance of personal resilience and adaptability in social work
  • Demonstrates the ability to take responsibility for own learning and development.

Entry - Values and Ethics

Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making, including through partnership with people who use their services. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of their profession, its ethical standards and relevant law.

  • Recognises the impact their own values and attitudes can have on relationships with others
  • Understands the importance of seeking the perspectives and views of service users and carers
  • Recognises that social workers will need to deal with conflict and use the authority invested in their role.

Entry - Diversity

Social workers understand that diversity characterises and shapes human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. Diversity is multi-dimensional and includes race, disability, class, economic status, age, sexuality, gender and transgender, faith and belief. Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a person's life experience may include oppression, marginalisation and alienation as well as privilege, power and acclaim, and are able to challenge appropriately.

  • Demonstrates an initial understanding of difference and diversity within society and the implications of this for social work practice
  • Is receptive to the views of others.

Entry - Rights and Justice

Social workers recognise the fundamental principles of human rights and equality, and that these are protected in national and international law, conventions and policies. They ensure these principles underpin their practice. Social workers understand the importance of using and contributing to case law and applying these rights in their own practice. They understand the effects of oppression, discrimination and poverty.

  • Recognises the contribution of social work to promoting social justice, inclusion and equality
  • Is receptive to the idea that there may be conflicts in the social work role between promoting rights and enforcing responsibilities.

Entry - Knowledge

Social workers understand psychological, social, cultural, spiritual and physical influences on people; human development throughout the life span and the legal framework for practice. They apply this knowledge in their work with individuals, families and communities. They know and use theories and methods of social work practice.

  • Identify how own learning (formal, informal and experiential) contributes to understanding the social work role.

Entry - Critical Reflection

Social workers are knowledgeable about and apply the principles of critical thinking and reasoned discernment. They identify, distinguish, evaluate and integrate multiple sources of knowledge and evidence. These include practice evidence, their own practice experience, service user and carer experience together with research-based, organisational, policy and legal knowledge. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity.

  • Demonstrates an ability to reflect on and analyse own experience (educational, personal, formal and informal)
  • Demonstrates curiosity and critical thinking about social issue.

Entry - Intervention and Skills

Social workers engage with individuals, families, groups and communities, working alongside people to assess and intervene. They enable effective relationships and are effective communicators, using appropriate skills. Using their professional judgement, they employ a range of interventions: promoting independence, providing support and protection, taking preventative action and ensuring safety whilst balancing rights and risks. They understand and take account of differentials in power, and are able to use authority appropriately. They evaluate their own practice and the outcomes for those they work with.

  • Communicates clearly, accurately and appropriately to the level of training applied for, in verbal and written forms
  • Demonstrates an ability to engage with people with empathy.

Entry - Contexts and Organisations

Social workers are informed about and pro-actively responsive to the challenges and opportunities that come with changing social contexts and constructs. They fulfil this responsibility in accordance with their professional values and ethics, both as individual professionals and as members of the organisation in which they work. They collaborate, inform and are informed by their work with others, inter-professionally and with communities.

  • Demonstrates understanding of importance of working as a member of a team and an organisation.

Entry - Professional Leadership

The social work profession evolves through the contribution of its members in activities such as practice research, supervision, assessment of practice, teaching and management. An individual's contribution will gain influence when undertaken as part of a learning, practice-focused organisation. Learning may be facilitated with a wide range of people including social work colleagues, service users and carers, volunteers, foster carers and other professionals.

  • Recognises how own learning, behaviour and ideas can influence and benefit others.

Readiness For Direct Practice - Professionalism

Social workers are members of an internationally recognised profession, a title protected in UK law. Social workers demonstrate professional commitment by taking responsibility for their conduct, practice and learning, with support through supervision. As representatives of the social work profession they safeguard its reputation and are accountable to the professional regulator.

  • Describe the role of the social worker
  • Describe the mutual roles and responsibilities in supervision
  • Describe the importance of professional behaviour
  • Describe the importance of personal and professional boundaries
  • Demonstrate ability to learn, using a range of approaches
  • Describe the importance of emotional resilience in social work.

Readiness For Direct Practice - Values and Ethics

Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making, including through partnership with people who use their services. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of their profession, its ethical standards and relevant law.

  • Understand the profession's ethical principles and their relevance to practice
  • Demonstrate awareness of own personal values and how these can impact on practice.

Readiness For Direct Practice - Diversity

Social workers understand that diversity characterises and shapes human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. Diversity is multi-dimensional and includes race, disability, class, economic status, age, sexuality, gender and transgender, faith and belief. Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a person's life experience may include oppression, marginalisation and alienation as well as privilege, power and acclaim, and are able to challenge appropriately.

  • Recognise the importance of diversity in human identity and experience, and the application of anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive principles in social work practice.

Readiness For Direct Practice - Rights and Justice

Social workers recognise the fundamental principles of human rights and equality, and that these are protected in national and international law, conventions and policies. They ensure these principles underpin their practice. Social workers understand the importance of using and contributing to case law and applying these rights in their own practice. They understand the effects of oppression, discrimination and poverty.

  • Understand the principles of rights, justice and economic well-being, and their significance for social work practice.

Readiness For Direct Practice - Knowledge

Social workers understand psychological, social, cultural, spiritual and physical influences on people; human development throughout the life span and the legal framework for practice. They apply this knowledge in their work with individuals, families and communities. They know and use theories and methods of social work practice.

  • Demonstrate an initial understanding of the application of research, theory and knowledge from sociology, social policy, psychology, health and human growth and development to social work
  • Demonstrate an initial understanding of the legal and policy frameworks and guidance that inform and mandate social work practice
  • Demonstrate an initial understanding of the range of theories and models for social work intervention.

Readiness For Direct Practice - Critical Reflection

Social workers are knowledgeable about and apply the principles of critical thinking and reasoned discernment. They identify, distinguish, evaluate and integrate multiple sources of knowledge and evidence. These include practice evidence, their own practice experience, service user and carer experience together with research-based, organisational, policy and legal knowledge. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity.

  • Understand the role of reflective practice and demonstrate basic skills of reflection
  • Understand the need to construct hypotheses in social work practice
  • Recognise and describe why evidence is important in social work practice.

Readiness For Direct Practice - Intervention and Skills

Social workers engage with individuals, families, groups and communities, working alongside people to assess and intervene. They enable effective relationships and are effective communicators, using appropriate skills. Using their professional judgement, they employ a range of interventions: promoting independence, providing support and protection, taking preventative action and ensuring safety whilst balancing rights and risks. They understand and take account of differentials in power, and are able to use authority appropriately. They evaluate their own practice and the outcomes for those they work with.

  • Demonstrate core communication skills and the capacity to develop them
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage with people in order to build compassionate and effective relationships
  • Demonstrate awareness of a range of frameworks to assess and plan intervention
  • Demonstrate basic ability to produce written documents relevant for practice
  • Demonstrate initial awareness of risk and safeguarding.

Readiness For Direct Practice - Contexts and Organisations

Social workers are informed about and pro-actively responsive to the challenges and opportunities that come with changing social contexts and constructs. They fulfil this responsibility in accordance with their professional values and ethics, both as individual professionals and as members of the organisation in which they work. They collaborate, inform and are informed by their work with others, inter-professionally and with communities.

  • Demonstrate awareness of the impact of organisational context on social work practice.

Readiness For Direct Practice - Professional Leadership

The social work profession evolves through the contribution of its members in activities such as practice research, supervision, assessment of practice, teaching and management. An individual's contribution will gain influence when undertaken as part of a learning, practice-focused organisation. Learning may be facilitated with a wide range of people including social work colleagues, service users and carers, volunteers, foster carers and other professionals.

  • Demonstrate awareness of the importance of professional leadership in social work.

End of First Placement - Professionalism

Social workers are members of an internationally recognised profession, a title protected in UK law. Social workers demonstrate professional commitment by taking responsibility for their conduct, practice and learning, with support through supervision. As representatives of the social work profession they safeguard its reputation and are accountable to the professional regulator.

  • Recognise the role of the professional social worker in a range of contexts
  • Recognise the important role of supervision, and make an active contribution
  • Demonstrate professionalism in terms of presentation, demeanour, reliability, honesty and respectfulness
  • With guidance take responsibility for managing your time and workload effectively
  • Be able to show awareness of personal and professional boundaries
  • With guidance recognise your limitations, and how to seek advice
  • Recognise and act on own learning needs in response to practice experience
  • Show awareness of own safety, health, well-being and emotional resilience and seek advice as necessary
  • Identify concerns about practice and procedures and how they can be questioned.

End of First Placement - Values and Ethics

Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making, including through partnership with people who use their services. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of their profession, its ethical standards and relevant law.

  • Understand and, with support, apply the profession's ethical principles
  • Recognise and, with support, manage the impact of own values on professional practice
  • Identify and, with guidance, manage potentially conflicting values and ethical dilemmas
  • Elicit and respect the needs and views of service users and carers and, with support, promote their participation in decision-making wherever possible
  • Recognise and, with support, promote individuals' rights to autonomy and self-determination
  • Promote and protect the privacy of individuals within and outside their families and networks, recognising the requirements of professional accountability and information sharing.

End of First Placement - Diversity

Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a person's life experience may include oppression, marginalisation and alienation as well as privilege, power and acclaim, and are able to challenge appropriately.

  • Understand how an individual's identity is informed by factors such as culture, economic status, family composition, life experiences and characteristics, and take account of these to understand their experiences
  • With reference to current legislative requirements, recognise personal and organisational discrimination and oppression, and identify ways in which they might be challenged
  • Recognise and, with support, manage the impact on people of the power invested in your role.

End of First Placement - Rights and Justice

Social workers recognise the fundamental principles of human rights and equality, and that these are protected in national and international law, conventions and policies. They ensure these principles underpin their practice. Social workers understand the importance of using and contributing to case law and applying these rights in their own practice. They understand the effects of oppression, discrimination and poverty.

  • Understand and, with support, apply in practice the principles of social justice, inclusion and equality
  • Understand how legislation and guidance can advance or constrain people's rights
  • Work within the principles of human and civil rights and equalities legislation
  • Recognise the impact of poverty and social exclusion and promote enhanced economic status through access to education, work, housing, health services and welfare benefits
  • Recognise the value of independent advocacy.

End of First Placement - Knowledge

Social workers understand psychological, social, cultural, spiritual and physical influences on people; human development throughout the life span and the legal framework for practice. They apply this knowledge in their work with individuals, families and communities. They know and use theories and methods of social work practice.

  • With guidance apply research, theory and knowledge from sociology, social policy, psychology, health and human growth and development to social work practice
  • Understand the legal and policy frameworks and guidance that inform and mandate social work practice, relevant to placement setting
  • Understand forms of harm, their impact on people, and the implications for practice
  • Apply knowledge from a range of theories and models for social work intervention with individuals, families, groups and communities, and the methods derived from them
  • Value and take account of the expertise of service users and carers and professionals.

End of First Placement - Critical Reflection

Social workers are knowledgeable about and apply the principles of critical thinking and reasoned discernment. They identify, distinguish, evaluate and integrate multiple sources of knowledge and evidence. These include practice evidence, their own practice experience, service user and carer experience together with research-based, organisational, policy and legal knowledge. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity.

  • Recognise the importance of applying imagination, creativity and curiosity to practice
  • Inform decision-making through the identification and gathering of information from more than one source and, with support, question its reliability and validity
  • With guidance use reflection and analysis in practice
  • With guidance understand how to evaluate and review hypotheses in response to information available at the time and apply in practice with support
  • With guidance use evidence to inform decisions.

End of First Placement - Intervention and Skills

Social workers engage with individuals, families, groups and communities, working alongside people to assess and intervene. They enable effective relationships and are effective communicators, using appropriate skills. Using their professional judgement, they employ a range of interventions: promoting independence, providing support and protection, taking preventative action and ensuring safety whilst balancing rights and risks. They understand and take account of differentials in power, and are able to use authority appropriately. They evaluate their own practice and the outcomes for those they work with.

  • With guidance use a range of verbal, non-verbal and written methods of communication relevant to the placement
  • With guidance communicate information, advice, instruction and opinion so as to advocate, influence and persuade
  • Demonstrate the ability to build and conclude compassionate and effective relationships appropriate to the placement setting
  • With guidance demonstrate an holistic approach to the identification of needs, circumstances, rights, strengths and risks
  • Identify and use appropriate frameworks to assess, give meaning to, plan, implement and review effective interventions and evaluate the outcomes
  • With guidance use a planned and structured approach, informed by at least two social work methods and models
  • Recognise the importance of community resources, groups and networks for individuals
  • Demonstrate skills in recording and report writing appropriate to the setting
  • With guidance demonstrate skills in sharing information appropriately and respectfully
  • Demonstrate awareness of the impact of multiple factors, changing circumstances and uncertainty in people's lives
  • With guidance understand the authority of the social work role
  • With guidance identify the factors that may create or exacerbate risk to individuals, their families or carers, to the public or to professionals, including yourself
  • With guidance identify appropriate responses to safeguard vulnerable people.

End of First Placement - Contexts and Organisations

Social workers are informed about and pro-actively responsive to the challenges and opportunities that come with changing social contexts and constructs. They fulfil this responsibility in accordance with their professional values and ethics, both as individual professionals and as members of the organisation in which they work. They collaborate, inform and are informed by their work with others, inter-professionally and with communities.

  • With guidance, recognise that social work operates within, and responds to, changing economic, social, political and organisational contexts
  • With guidance understand legal obligations, structures and behaviours within organisations and how these impact on policy, procedure and practice
  • With guidance work within the organisational context of your placement setting and understand the lines of accountability
  • Understand and respect the role of others within the organisation and work effectively with them
  • Take responsibility for your role and impact within teams and with guidance contribute positively to team working
  • Understand the inter-agency, multi-disciplinary and inter-professional dimensions to practice and, with guidance, demonstrate partnership working.

End of First Placement - Professional Leadership

The social work profession evolves through the contribution of its members in activities such as practice research, supervision, assessment of practice, teaching and management. An individual's contribution will gain influence when undertaken as part of a learning, practice-focused organisation. Learning may be facilitated with a wide range of people including social work colleagues, service users and carers, volunteers, foster carers and other professionals.

  • Identify how professional leadership in social work can enhance practice
  • Recognise the value of sharing and supporting the learning and development of others.

End of Last Placement - Professionalism

Social workers are members of an internationally recognised profession, a title protected in UK law. Social workers demonstrate professional commitment by taking responsibility for their conduct, practice and learning, with support through supervision. As representatives of the social work profession they safeguard its reputation and are accountable to the professional regulator.

  • Be able to meet the requirements of the professional regulator
  • Be able to explain the role of the social worker in a range of contexts, and uphold the reputation of the profession
  • Demonstrate an effective and active use of supervision for accountability, professional reflection and development
  • Demonstrate professionalism in terms of presentation, demeanour, reliability, honesty and respectfulness
  • Take responsibility for managing your time and workload effectively, and begin to prioritise your activity including supervision time
  • Recognise the impact of self in interaction with others, making appropriate use of personal experience
  • Be able to recognise and maintain personal and professional boundaries
  • Recognise your professional limitations and how to seek advice
  • Demonstrate a commitment to your continuing learning and development
  • With support, take steps to manage and promote own safety, health, well-being and emotional resilience
  • Identify concerns about practice and procedures and, with support, begin to find appropriate means of challenge.

End of Last Placement - Values and Ethics

Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making, including through partnership with people who use their services. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of their profession, its ethical standards and relevant law.

  • Understand and apply the profession's ethical principles and legislation, taking account of these in reaching decisions
  • Recognise and, with support, manage the impact of own values on professional practice
  • Manage potentially conflicting or competing values, and, with guidance, recognise, reflect on, and work with ethical dilemmas
  • Demonstrate respectful partnership work with service users and carers, eliciting and respecting their needs and views, and promoting their participation in decision-making wherever possible
  • Recognise and promote individual's rights to autonomy and self-determination
  • Promote and protect the privacy of individuals within and outside their families and networks, recognising the requirements of professional accountability and information sharing.

End of Last Placement - Diversity

Social workers understand that diversity characterises and shapes human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. Diversity is multi-dimensional and includes race, disability, class, economic status, age, sexuality, gender and transgender, faith and belief. Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a person's life experience may include oppression, marginalisation and alienation as well as privilege, power and acclaim, and are able to challenge appropriately.

  • Understand how an individual's identity is informed by factors such as culture, economic status, family composition, life experiences and characteristics, and take account of these to understand their experiences, questioning assumptions where necessary
  • With reference to current legislative requirements, recognise personal and organisational discrimination and oppression and with guidance make use of a range of approaches to challenge them
  • Recognise and manage the impact on people of the power invested in your role.

End of Last Placement - Rights and Justice

Social workers recognise the fundamental principles of human rights and equality, and that these are protected in national and international law, conventions and policies. They ensure these principles underpin their practice. Social workers understand the importance of using and contributing to case law and applying these rights in their own practice. They understand the effects of oppression, discrimination and poverty.

  • Understand, identify and apply in practice the principles of social justice, inclusion and equality
  • Understand how legislation and guidance can advance or constrain people's rights and recognise how the law may be used to protect or advance their rights and entitlements
  • Work within the principles of human and civil rights and equalities legislation, differentiating and beginning to work with absolute, qualified and competing rights and differing needs and perspectives
  • Recognise the impact of poverty and social exclusion and promote enhanced economic status through access to education, work, housing, health services and welfare benefits
  • Recognise the value of - and aid access to - independent advocacy.

End of Last Placement - Knowledge

Social workers understand psychological, social, cultural, spiritual and physical influences on people; human development throughout the life span and the legal framework for practice. They apply this knowledge in their work with individuals, families and communities. They know and use theories and methods of social work practice.

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the application to social work of research, theory and knowledge from sociology, social policy, psychology and health
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the legal and policy frameworks and guidance that inform and mandate social work practice, recognising the scope for professional judgement
  • Demonstrate and apply to practice a working knowledge of human growth and development throughout the life course
  • Recognise the short and long term impact of psychological, socio-economic, environmental and physiological factors on peoples lives, taking into account age and development, and how this informs practice
  • Recognise how systemic approaches can be used to understand the person-in-the-environment and inform your practice
  • Acknowledge the centrality of relationships for people and the key concepts of attachment, separation, loss, change and resilience
  • Understand forms of harm and their impact on people, and the implications for practice, drawing on concepts of strength, resilience, vulnerability, risk and resistance, and apply to practice
  • Demonstrate a critical knowledge of the range of theories and models for social work intervention with individuals, families, groups and communities, and the methods derived from them
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of social welfare policy, its evolution, implementation and impact on people, social work, other professions, and inter-agency working
  • Recognise the contribution, and begin to make use, of research to inform practice
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of research methods
  • Value and take account of the expertise of service users, carers and professionals.

End of Last Placement - Critical Reflection

Social workers are knowledgeable about and apply the principles of critical thinking and reasoned discernment. They identify, distinguish, evaluate and integrate multiple sources of knowledge and evidence. These include practice evidence, their own practice experience, service user and carer experience together with research-based, organisational, policy and legal knowledge. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity.

  • Apply imagination, creativity and curiosity to practice
  • Inform decision-making through the identification and gathering of information from multiple sources, actively seeking new sources
  • With support, rigorously question and evaluate the reliability and validity of information from different sources
  • Demonstrate a capacity for logical, systematic, critical and reflective reasoning and apply the theories and techniques of reflective practice
  • Know how to formulate, test, evaluate, and review hypotheses in response to information available at the time and apply in practice
  • Begin to formulate and make explicit, evidence-informed judgements and justifiable decisions.

End of Last Placement - Intervention and Skills

Social workers engage with individuals, families, groups and communities, working alongside people to assess and intervene. They enable effective relationships and are effective communicators, using appropriate skills. Using their professional judgement, they employ a range of interventions: promoting independence, providing support and protection, taking preventative action and ensuring safety whilst balancing rights and risks. They understand and take account of differentials in power, and are able to use authority appropriately. They evaluate their own practice and the outcomes for those they work with.

  • Identify and apply a range of verbal, non-verbal and written methods of communication and adapt them in line with peoples age, comprehension and culture
  • Be able to communicate information, advice, instruction and professional opinion so as to advocate, influence and persuade
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage with people, and build, manage, sustain and conclude compassionate and effective relationships
  • Demonstrate an holistic approach to the identification of needs, circumstances, rights, strengths and risks
  • Select and use appropriate frameworks to assess, give meaning to, plan, implement and review effective interventions and evaluate the outcomes, in partnership with service users
  • Use a planned and structured approach, informed by social work methods, models and tools, to promote positive change and independence and to prevent harm
  • Recognise how the development of community resources, groups and networks enhance outcomes for individuals
  • Maintain accurate, comprehensible, succinct and timely records and reports in accordance with applicable legislation, protocols and guidelines, to support professional judgement and organisational responsibilities
  • Demonstrate skills in sharing information appropriately and respectfully
  • Recognise complexity, multiple factors, changing circumstances and uncertainty in people's lives, to be able to prioritise your intervention
  • Understand the authority of the social work role and begin to use this appropriately as an accountable professional
  • Recognise the factors that create or exacerbate risk to individuals, their families or carers, to the public or to professionals, including yourself, and contribute to the assessment and management of risk
  • With support, identify appropriate responses to safeguard vulnerable people and promote their well being.

End of Last Placement - Contexts and Organisations

Social workers are informed about and pro-actively responsive to the challenges and opportunities that come with changing social contexts and constructs. They fulfil this responsibility in accordance with their professional values and ethics, both as individual professionals and as members of the organisation in which they work. They collaborate, inform and are informed by their work with others, inter-professionally and with communities.

  • Recognise that social work operates within, and responds to, changing economic, social, political and organisational contexts
  • Understand the roles and responsibilities of social workers in a range of organisations, lines of accountability and the boundaries of professional autonomy and discretion
  • Understand legal obligations, structures and behaviours within organisations and how these impact on policy, procedure and practice
  • Be able to work within an organisation's remit and contribute to its evaluation and development
  • Understand and respect the role of others within the organisation and work effectively with them
  • Take responsibility for your role and impact within teams and be able to contribute positively to effective team working
  • Understand the inter-agency, multi-disciplinary and inter-professional dimensions to practice and demonstrate effective partnership working.

End of Last Placement - Professional Leadership

The social work profession evolves through the contribution of its members in activities such as practice research, supervision, assessment of practice, teaching and management. An individual's contribution will gain influence when undertaken as part of a learning, practice-focused organisation. Learning may be facilitated with a wide range of people including social work colleagues, service users and carers, volunteers, foster carers and other professionals.

  • Recognise the importance of, and begin to demonstrate, professional leadership as a social worker
  • Recognise the value of, and contribute to supporting the learning and development of others.

ASYE - Professionalism

Social workers are members of an internationally recognised profession, a title protected in UK law. Social workers demonstrate professional commitment by taking responsibility for their conduct, practice and learning, with support through supervision. As representatives of the social work profession they safeguard its reputation and are accountable to the professional regulator.

  • Be able to meet the requirements of the professional regulator
  • Be able to explain the role of the social worker in a range of contexts, and uphold the reputation of the profession
  • Make pro active use of supervision to reflect critically on practice, explore different approaches to your work, support your development across the nine capabilities and understand the boundaries of professional accountability
  • Demonstrate professionalism in terms of presentation, demeanour, reliability, honesty and respectfulness
  • Demonstrate workload management skills and develop the ability to prioritise
  • Recognise and balance your own personal/professional boundaries in response to changing and more complex contexts
  • Recognise your own professional limitations, and how to seek advice
  • Identify your learning needs; assume responsibility for improving your practice through appropriate professional development
  • Develop ways to promote well-being at work, identifying strategies to protect and promote your own well being and the well being of others
  • Identify and implement strategies for responding appropriately to concerns about practice or procedures, seeking guidance if required.

ASYE - Values and Ethics

Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making, including through partnership with people who use their services. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of their profession, its ethical standards and relevant law.

  • Understand and apply the profession’s ethical principles and legislation, taking account of these in reaching decisions
  • Recognise, and manage the impact of your own values on professional practice
  • Recognise and manage conflicting values and ethical dilemmas to arrive at principled decisions
  • Demonstrate respectful partnership work with service users and carers, eliciting and respecting their needs and views, and promoting their participation in decision-making wherever possible
  • Recognise and promote individuals rights to autonomy and self-determination
  • Promote and protect the privacy of individuals within and outside their families and networks, recognising the requirements of professional accountability and information sharing.

ASYE - Diversity

Social workers understand that diversity characterises and shapes human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. Diversity is multi-dimensional and includes race, disability, class, economic status, age, sexuality, gender and transgender, faith and belief. Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a person's life experience may include oppression, marginalisation and alienation as well as privilege, power and acclaim, and are able to challenge appropriately.

  • Identify and take account of the significance of diversity and discrimination on the lives of people, and show application of this understanding in your practice
  • Recognise oppression and discrimination by individuals or organisations and implement appropriate strategies to challenge
  • Identify the impact of the power invested in your role on relationships and your intervention, and be able to adapt your practice accordingly.

ASYE - Rights and Justice

Social workers recognise the fundamental principles of human rights and equality, and that these are protected in national and international law, conventions and policies. They ensure these principles underpin their practice. Social workers understand the importance of using and contributing to case law and applying these rights in their own practice. They understand the effects of oppression, discrimination and poverty.

  • Begin to integrate principles of and entitlements to social justice, social inclusion and equality in your analysis and practice, by identifying factors that contribute to inequality and exclusion, and supporting people to pursue options to enhance their well being
  • Address oppression and discrimination applying the law to protect and advance people's rights, recognising how legislation can constrain or advance these rights
  • Apply in practice principles of human, civil rights and equalities legislation, and manage competing rights, differing needs and perspectives
  • Recognise the impact of poverty and social exclusion and promote enhanced economic status through access to education, work, housing, health services and welfare benefit
  • Empower service users through recognising their rights and enable access where appropriate to independent advocacy.

ASYE - Knowledge

Social workers understand psychological, social, cultural, spiritual and physical influences on people; human development throughout the life span and the legal framework for practice. They apply this knowledge in their work with individuals, families and communities. They know and use theories and methods of social work practice.

  • Consolidate, develop and demonstrate comprehensive understanding and application of the knowledge gained in your initial training, and knowledge related to your specialist area of practice, including critical awareness of current issues and new evidence-based practice research
  • Demonstrate knowledge and application of appropriate legal and policy frameworks and guidance that inform and mandate social work practice. Apply legal reasoning, using professional legal expertise and advice appropriately, recognising where scope for professional judgement exists
  • Demonstrate and apply to practice a working knowledge of human growth and development throughout the life course
  • Recognise the short and long term impact of psychological, socio-economic, environmental and physiological factors on peoples lives, taking into account age and development, and how this informs practice
  • Recognise how systemic approaches can be used to understand the person-in-the-environment and inform your practice
  • Acknowledge the centrality of relationships for people and the key concepts of attachment, separation, loss, change and resilience
  • Understand forms of harm and their impact on people, and the implications for practice, drawing on concepts of strength, resilience, vulnerability, risk and resistance, and apply to practice
  • Demonstrate a critical knowledge of the range of theories and models for social work intervention with individuals, families, groups and communities, and the methods derived from them
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of social welfare policy, its evolution, implementation and impact on people, social work, other professions, and inter-agency working
  • Recognise the contribution, and begin to make use, of research to inform practice
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of research methods
  • Value and take account of the expertise of service users, carers and professionals.

ASYE - Critical Reflection

Social workers are knowledgeable about and apply the principles of critical thinking and reasoned discernment. They identify, distinguish, evaluate and integrate multiple sources of knowledge and evidence. These include practice evidence, their own practice experience, service user and carer experience together with research-based, organisational, policy and legal knowledge. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity.

  • Show creativity in tackling and solving problems, by considering a range of options to solve dilemmas.
  • Use reflective practice techniques to evaluate and critically analyse information, gained from a variety of sources, to construct and test hypotheses and make explicit evidence-informed decisions.

ASYE - Intervention and Skills

Social workers engage with individuals, families, groups and communities, working alongside people to assess and intervene. They enable effective relationships and are effective communicators, using appropriate skills. Using their professional judgement, they employ a range of interventions: promoting independence, providing support and protection, taking preventative action and ensuring safety whilst balancing rights and risks. They understand and take account of differentials in power, and are able to use authority appropriately. They evaluate their own practice and the outcomes for those they work with.

  • Use a range of methods to engage and communicate effectively with service users, eliciting the needs, wishes and feelings of all those involved, taking account of situations where these are not explicitly expressed
  • Demonstrate clear communication of evidence-based professional reasoning, judgements and decisions, to professional and non-professional audiences
  • Build and use effective relationships with a wide range of people, networks, communities and professionals to improve outcomes, showing an ability to manage resistance
  • Use appropriate assessment frameworks, applying information gathering skills to make and contribute to assessments, whilst continuing to build relationships and offer support
  • Select, use and review appropriate and timely social work interventions, informed by evidence of their effectiveness, that are best suited to the service user(s), family, carer, setting and self
  • Use a planned and structured approach, informed by social work methods, models and tools, to promote positive change and independence and to prevent harm
  • Recognise how the development of community resources, groups and networks enhance outcomes for individuals
  • Record information in a timely, respectful and accurate manner. Write records and reports, for a variety of purposes with language suited to function, using information management systems. Distinguish fact from opinion, and record conflicting views and perspectives
  • Share information consistently in ways that meet legal, ethical and agency requirements
  • Recognise complexity, multiple factors, changing circumstances and uncertainty in peoples lives, be able to prioritise your intervention
  • Use authority appropriately in your role
  • Demonstrate understanding of and respond to risk factors in your practice. Contribute to the assessment and management of risk, including strategies for reducing risk, distinguishing levels of risk for different situations
  • Demonstrate application of principles and practice for safeguarding adults and children including consideration of potential abuse. Apply strategies that aim to reduce and prevent harm and abuse.

ASYE - Contexts and Organisations

Social workers are informed about and pro-actively responsive to the challenges and opportunities that come with changing social contexts and constructs. They fulfil this responsibility in accordance with their professional values and ethics, both as individual professionals and as members of the organisation in which they work. They collaborate, inform and are informed by their work with others, inter-professionally and with communities.

  • Taking account of legal, operational and policy contexts, proactively engage with your own organisation and contribute to its evaluation and development
  • Proactively engage with colleagues, and a range of organisations to identify, assess, plan and support to the needs of service users and communities
  • Understand legal obligations, structures and behaviours within organisations and how these impact on policy, procedure and practice
  • Be able to work within an organisational remit and contribute to its evaluation and development
  • Understand and respect the role of others within the organisation and work effectively with them
  • Work effectively as a member of a team, demonstrating the ability to develop and maintain appropriate professional and inter-professional relationships, managing challenge and conflict with support.

ASYE - Professional Leadership

The social work profession evolves through the contribution of its members in activities such as practice research, supervision, assessment of practice, teaching and management. An individual's contribution will gain influence when undertaken as part of a learning, practice-focused organisation. Learning may be facilitated with a wide range of people including social work colleagues, service users and carers, volunteers, foster carers and other professionals.

  • Show the capacity for leading practice through the manner in which you conduct your professional role, your contribution to supervision and to team meetings
  • Take steps to enable the learning and development of others.

Social Worker - Professionalism

Social workers are members of an internationally recognised profession, a title protected in UK law. Social workers demonstrate professional commitment by taking responsibility for their conduct, practice and learning, with support through supervision. As representatives of the social work profession they safeguard its reputation and are accountable to the professional regulator.

  • Be able to meet the requirements of the professional regulator
  • Promote the profession in a growing range of contexts
  • Take responsibility for obtaining regular, effective supervision from a manager for effective practice, reflection and career development
  • Maintain professionalism in the face of more challenging circumstances
  • Manage workload independently, seeking support and suggesting solutions for workload difficulties
  • Maintain appropriate personal/professional boundaries in more challenging circumstances
  • Make skilled use of self as part of your interventions
  • Maintain awareness of own professional limitations and knowledge gaps. Establish a network of internal and external colleagues from whom to seek advice and expertise
  • Identify and act on learning needs for CPD, including through supervision
  • Routinely promote well-being at work
  • Raise and address issues of poor practice, internally through the organisation, and then independently if required.

Social Worker - Values and Ethics

Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making, including through partnership with people who use their services. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of their profession, its ethical standards and relevant law.

  • Demonstrate confident application of ethical reasoning to professional practice, rights and entitlements, questioning and challenging others using a legal and human rights framework
  • Critically reflect on and manage the influence and impact of own and others values on professional practice
  • Recognise and manage conflicting values and ethical dilemmas, in practice, using supervision and team discussion, questioning and challenging others, including those from other professions
  • Negotiate and establish boundaries to underpin partnership work with service users, carers and their networks, using transparency and honesty
  • Ensure practice is underpinned by policy, procedures and code of conduct to promote individuals rights to determine their own solutions, promoting problem-solving skills, whilst recognising how and when self-determination may be constrained (by the law)
  • Work to protect privacy and promote trust, whilst being able to justify, explain and take appropriate action when the right to privacy is over-ridden by professional or legal requirements.

Social Worker - Diversity

Social workers understand that diversity characterises and shapes human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. Diversity is multi-dimensional and includes race, disability, class, economic status, age, sexuality, gender and transgender, faith and belief. Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a persons life experience may include oppression, marginalisation and alienation as well as privilege, power and acclaim, and are able to challenge appropriately.

  • Recognise the complexity of identity and diversity of experience, and apply this to practice
  • Recognise discriminatory practices and develop a range of approaches to appropriately challenge service users, colleagues and senior staff
  • Critically reflect on and manage the power of your role in your relationship with others.

Social Worker - Rights and Justice

Social workers recognise the fundamental principles of human rights and equality, and that these are protected in national and international law, conventions and policies. They ensure these principles underpin their practice. Social workers understand the importance of using and contributing to case law and applying these rights in their own practice. They understand the effects of oppression, discrimination and poverty.

  • Routinely integrate the principles of and entitlements to social justice, social inclusion and equality, and with support, consider how and when challenge may be needed
  • Routinely apply the law to protect and advance people's rights and entitlements, identifying and highlighting situations where interpretations of the law are neither proportionate nor fair to promote autonomy and self-determination
  • Apply the principles and entitlements of human and civil rights to analyse, evaluate and challenge interventions that are unlawful and/or disproportionate
  • Analyse differing needs, perspectives and competing rights and apply to practice
  • Enable and support people to consider and pursue a range of options that may enhance economic status (through access to education, work, housing, health services and welfare benefits)
  • Where appropriate, set up and/or enable access to effective independent advocacy.

Social Worker - Knowledge

Social workers understand psychological, social, cultural, spiritual and physical influences on people; human development throughout the life span and the legal framework for practice. They apply this knowledge in their work with individuals, families and communities. They know and use theories and methods of social work practice.

  • Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding and use of knowledge related to your area of practice, including critical awareness of current issues and new evidence based practice research
  • Demonstrate knowledge and application of appropriate legal and policy frameworks and guidance that inform and mandate social work practice. Apply legal reasoning, using professional legal expertise and advice appropriately, recognising where scope for professional judgement exists
  • Demonstrate and apply to practice a working knowledge of human growth and development throughout the life course
  • Recognise the short and long term impact of psychological, socio-economic, environmental and physiological factors on peoples lives, taking into account age and development, and how this informs practice
  • Recognise how systemic approaches can be used to understand the person-in-the-environment and inform your practice
  • Acknowledge the centrality of relationships for people and the key concepts of attachment, separation, loss, change and resilience
  • Understand forms of harm and their impact on people, and the implications for practice, drawing on concepts of strength, resilience, vulnerability, risk and resistance, and apply to practice
  • Demonstrate a critical knowledge of the range of theories and models for social work intervention with individuals, families, groups and communities, and the methods derived from them
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of social welfare policy, its evolution, implementation and impact on people, social work, other professions, and inter-agency working
  • Recognise the contribution, and begin to make use, of research to inform practice
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of research methods
  • Value and take account of the expertise of service users, carers and professionals.

Social Worker - Critical Reflection

Social workers are knowledgeable about and apply the principles of critical thinking and reasoned discernment. They identify, distinguish, evaluate and integrate multiple sources of knowledge and evidence. These include practice evidence, their own practice experience, service user and carer experience together with research-based, organisational, policy and legal knowledge. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity.

  • Routinely and efficiently apply critical reflection and analysis to increasingly complex cases
  • Draw on a wide range of evidence sources to inform decision making
  • Ensure hypotheses and options are reviewed to inform judgement and decision making
  • Start to provide professional opinion.

Social Worker - Intervention and Skills

Social workers engage with individuals, families, groups and communities, working alongside people to assess and intervene. They enable effective relationships and are effective communicators, using appropriate skills. Using their professional judgement, they employ a range of interventions: promoting independence, providing support and protection, taking preventative action and ensuring safety whilst balancing rights and risks. They understand and take account of differentials in power, and are able to use authority appropriately. They evaluate their own practice and the outcomes for those they work with.

  • Communicate with compassion and authority in challenging situations and with resistant individuals
  • Routinely explain professional reasoning, judgements and decisions
  • Engage effectively with people in complex situations, both short-term and building relationships over time
  • Gather information so as to inform judgement for interventions in more complex situations and in response to challenge
  • Use assessment procedures discerningly so as to inform judgement
  • Develop a range of interventions; use them effectively and evaluate them in practice
  • Expand intervention methods and demonstrate expertise in one or more specific methods relevant to your setting
  • Make timely decisions when positive change is not happening
  • Actively support and initiate community groups and networks, including professional ones
  • Clearly report and record analysis and judgements
  • Demonstrate and promote appropriate information sharing
  • Use contingency planning to anticipate complexity and changing circumstances
  • Recognise and appropriately manage the authority inherent in your position
  • Demonstrate confident and effective judgement about risk and accountability in your decisions
  • Regularly undertake assessment and planning for safeguarding.

Social Worker - Contexts and Organisations

Social workers are informed about and pro-actively responsive to the challenges and opportunities that come with changing social contexts and constructs. They fulfil this responsibility in accordance with their professional values and ethics, both as individual professionals and as members of the organisation in which they work. They collaborate, inform and are informed by their work with others, inter-professionally and with communities.

  • Keep abreast of changing context at local and national level, and take account of these in practice
  • Demonstrate the ability to work within your own organisation, and identify and begin to work with the relationship between the organisation, practice and wider changing contexts
  • Work to and explain the relevant legal structures in the organisation, including basic case law; know when and how to access support and appropriate legal advice and consultation
  • Explore, and identify how organisational practice can support good social work practice
  • Keep abreast of changing roles in the organisation; recognise, value and engage with other specialist perspectives
  • Be confident about your role in the team, working positively with others; draw on and contribute to team working and collaborative support wherever possible
  • Take an active role in inter-professional and inter-agency work, building own network and collaborative working.

Social Worker - Professional Leadership

The social work profession evolves through the contribution of its members in activities such as practice research, supervision, assessment of practice, teaching and management. An individuals contribution will gain influence when undertaken as part of a learning, practice-focused organisation. Learning may be facilitated with a wide range of people including social work colleagues, service users and carers, volunteers, foster carers and other professionals.

  • Contribute to and promote the development of practice, taking the initiative to test new approaches
  • Contribute to the learning of others
  • Practice Educator Standards Stage 1: Domain A,B,C.

Experienced Social Worker - Professionalism

Social workers are members of an internationally recognised profession, a title protected in UK law. Social workers demonstrate professional commitment by taking responsibility for their conduct, practice and learning, with support through supervision. As representatives of the social work profession they safeguard its reputation and are accountable to the professional regulator.

  • Be able to meet the requirements of the professional regulator
  • Model the social work role, set expectations for others and contribute to the public face of the organisation
  • Expect supervision that covers practice, organisational and management aspects of role, applying critical reflection throughout
  • Model and help others to demonstrate professionalism
  • Model and help others with effective workload management skills
  • Model and help others to maintain professional/personal boundaries and skilled use of self
  • Maintain awareness of own professional limitations and knowledge gaps. Establish a network of internal and external colleagues from whom to seek advice and expertise
  • Contribute to a learning environment for self, team and, colleagues. Practice Educator Standards Stage 2 Domain D (see also capability 9)
  • Recognise and seek ways to promote well-being for team and colleagues
  • Promote up to date expectations about practice norms, identifying and helping resolve poor practice issues.

Experienced Social Worker - Values and Ethics

Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making, including through partnership with people who use their services. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of their profession, its ethical standards and relevant law.

  • Demonstrate confident and critical application of professional ethical principles to decision-making and practice, supporting others to do so using a legal and human rights framework
  • Model and support others to reflect on and manage the influence and impact of own values on professional practice
  • Provide guidance and support to analyse, reflect on and work with ethical dilemmas
  • Demonstrate confident application of an understanding of the benefits and limitations of partnership work, support others to do so, and promote service user and carer participation in developing service delivery
  • Promote and advance wherever possible individual's rights to autonomy and self-determination, providing support, guidance and challenge to others
  • Demonstrate skills in the sensitive exploration of issues of privacy and information-sharing in complex or risky situations, offering support and guidance to colleagues in managing such these dilemmas.

Experienced Social Worker - Diversity

Social workers understand that diversity characterises and shapes human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. Diversity is multi-dimensional and includes race, disability, class, economic status, age, sexuality, gender and transgender, faith and belief. Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a person's life experience may include oppression, marginalisation and alienation as well as privilege, power and acclaim, and are able to challenge appropriately.

  • Inform, guide and model good practice in the application of understanding of identity and diversity to practice; identifying and taking up issues when principles of diversity are contravened in the organisation
  • Model critically reflective practice and support others to recognise and challenge discrimination, identifying and referring breaches and limitations in the ability of your own or other organisation's; ability to advance equality and diversity and comply with the law
  • Demonstrate and model the effective and positive use of power and authority, whilst recognising and providing guidance to others as to how it may be used oppressively.

Experienced Social Worker - Rights and Justice

Social workers recognise the fundamental principles of human rights and equality, and that these are protected in national and international law, conventions and policies. They ensure these principles underpin their practice. Social workers understand the importance of using and contributing to case law and applying these rights in their own practice. They understand the effects of oppression, discrimination and poverty.

  • Provide guidance and challenge to others about applying the principles of social justice, social inclusion and equality to decision-making
  • Demonstrate ability to interpret and use current legislation and guidance to protect and/or advance peoples rights and entitlements, balancing use of different legislation to achieve the best outcomes; support colleagues (both inside and outside the organisation) to do so
  • Be able to communicate legislative issues to other professionals and agencies
  • Model best practice in applying human and civil rights, providing support to others and challenge where required
  • Support others to enable individuals to access opportunities that may enhance their economic status (e.g. education, work, housing, health services and welfare benefits)
  • Promote access to independent advocacy, ensuring best practice and critical review, and contribute to the evaluation of independent advocacy.

Experienced Social Worker - Knowledge

Social workers understand psychological, social, cultural, spiritual and physical influences on people; human development throughout the life span and the legal framework for practice. They apply this knowledge in their work with individuals, families and communities. They know and use theories and methods of social work practice.

  • Develop knowledge in one or more specialist areas of your practice. Expand your knowledge to inform the connections between this and other settings or areas of practice
  • Demonstrate knowledge and application of appropriate legal and policy frameworks and guidance that inform and mandate social work practice. Apply legal reasoning, using professional legal expertise and advice appropriately, recognising where scope for professional judgement exists
  • Demonstrate and apply to practice a working knowledge of human growth and development throughout the life course
  • Recognise the short and long term impact of psychological, socio-economic, environmental and physiological factors on people’s lives, taking into account age and development, and how this informs practice
  • Recognise how systemic approaches can be used to understand the person-in-the-environment and inform your practice
  • Acknowledge the centrality of relationships for people and the key concepts of attachment, separation, loss, change and resilience
  • Understand forms of harm and their impact on people, and the implications for practice, drawing on concepts of strength, resilience, vulnerability, risk and resistance, and apply to practice
  • Demonstrate a critical knowledge of the range of theories and models for social work intervention with individuals, families, groups and communities, and the methods derived from them
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of social welfare policy, its evolution, implementation and impact on people, social work, other professions, and inter-agency working
  • Recognise the contribution, and begin to make use, of research to inform practice
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of research methods
  • Value and take account of the expertise of service users, carers and professionals.

Experienced Social Worker - Critical Reflection

Social workers are knowledgeable about and apply the principles of critical thinking and reasoned discernment. They identify, distinguish, evaluate and integrate multiple sources of knowledge and evidence. These include practice evidence, their own practice experience, service user and carer experience together with research-based, organisational, policy and legal knowledge. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity.

  • Routinely and efficiently apply critical reflection and analysis to increasingly complex cases
  • Draw on a wide range of evidence sources to inform decision making
  • Ensure hypotheses and options are reviewed to inform judgement and decision making
  • Start to provide professional opinion.

Experienced Social Worker - Intervention and Skills

Social workers engage with individuals, families, groups and communities, working alongside people to assess and intervene. They enable effective relationships and are effective communicators, using appropriate skills. Using their professional judgement, they employ a range of interventions: promoting independence, providing support and protection, taking preventative action and ensuring safety whilst balancing rights and risks. They understand and take account of differentials in power, and are able to use authority appropriately. They evaluate their own practice and the outcomes for those they work with.

  • Communicate skilfully and confidently in complex or high risk situations. Model and help others to develop communication skills
  • Sustain and model engagement with people in fluctuating circumstances and capacities, including where there is hostility and risk
  • Be able to gather information quickly and effectively so as to inform judgement for interventions including in crises, and in response to challenge, or in the absence of complete information
  • Use assessment procedures discerningly so as to inform judgement
  • Maintain and expand a range of frameworks for assessment and intervention
  • Demonstrate skilled use of a range of frameworks for assessment and intervention
  • Actively support and initiate community groups and networks, including professional ones
  • Contribute to the development of the organisations information strategy and systems
  • Model and help others with appropriate information sharing
  • Model and help others to manage changing circumstances
  • Recognise and appropriately manage the authority inherent in your position
  • Anticipate, assess and manage risk, including in more complex cases, and support others to develop risk management skills
  • Undertake assessment and planning for safeguarding in more complex cases, and help others with safeguarding skills.

Experienced Social Worker - Contexts and Organisations

Social workers are informed about and pro-actively responsive to the challenges and opportunities that come with changing social contexts and constructs. They fulfil this responsibility in accordance with their professional values and ethics, both as individual professionals and as members of the organisation in which they work. They collaborate, inform and are informed by their work with others, inter-professionally and with communities.

  • Keep abreast of changing contexts at local and national level, and take account of these in practice
  • Demonstrate the ability to work within your own organisation, and identify and begin to work with the relationship between the organisation, practice and wider changing contexts
  • Work to and explain the relevant legal structures in the organisation, including basic case law; know when and how to access support and appropriate legal advice and consultation
  • Explore, and identify how organisational practice can support good social work practice
  • Keep abreast of changing roles in the organisation; recognise, value and engage with other specialist perspectives
  • Be confident about your role in the team, working positively with others; draw on and contribute to team working and collaborative support wherever possible
  • Take an active role in inter-professional and inter-agency work, building own network and collaborative working.

Experienced Social Worker - Professional Leadership

The social work profession evolves through the contribution of its members in activities such as practice research, supervision, assessment of practice, teaching and management. An individuals contribution will gain influence when undertaken as part of a learning, practice-focused organisation. Learning may be facilitated with a wide range of people including social work colleagues, service users and carers, volunteers, foster carers and other professionals.

  • Contribute to organisational developments
  • Play leading role in practice development in the team and help sustain a learning culture
  • Provide supervision to colleagues as organisation determines. Support others to manage and prioritise work
  • Assess and manage the work of social work students and ASYE
  • Practice Educator Standards Stage 2: Domain B and C (see also capability 1).

Advanced Level - Professionalism

Social workers are members of an internationally recognised profession, a title protected in UK law. Social workers demonstrate professional commitment by taking responsibility for their conduct, practice and learning, with support through supervision. As representatives of the social work profession they safeguard its reputation and are accountable to the professional regulator.

  • Be able to meet the requirements of the professional regulator
  • Model the social work role, promote social work and decision-making within and outside the organisation
  • Model and use critical reflective skills in management, practice or organisational supervision settings to enhance your own and others practice
  • Model and demonstrate professionalism, ensure professional social work standards are maintained throughout your area of responsibility
  • Model and take responsibility for the positive use of workload tools; using workload data to inform the organisation’s workload management and risk management approaches
  • Model and help others to maintain professional/personal boundaries and the skilled use of self in more complex situations
  • Maintain awareness of own professional limitations, knowledge gaps and conflicts of interest, actively seeking to address issues for self and others
  • Develop and maintain a network of internal and external colleagues, with whom to seek and share advice, expertise and new developments in social work
  • Foster and support an environment that promotes learning and practice development within the work place
  • Foster and maintain a work environment which promotes health, safety and wellbeing of self and others
  • Identify and collaborate to resolve concerns about practice, following procedures as appropriate
  • Contribute to the development and implementation of procedures that are fit for purpose, enhance best practice and contribute to better outcomes.

Advanced Level - Values and Ethics

Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making, including through partnership with people who use their services. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of their profession, its ethical standards and relevant law.

  • Model and promote confident and critical application of professional ethics to decision-making, using a legal and human rights framework, and support others to do so
  • Model and promote a culture which encourages reflection on the influence and impact of own values on professional practice
  • Demonstrate confident management and arbitration of ethical dilemmas, providing guidance and opportunities for professional development
  • Promote and support a partnership approach to working with individuals, communities, families and carers, providing clarity and reasoning when this approach is not appropriate
  • Promote people’s rights to autonomy and self-determination, supporting, challenging and guiding others as appropriate
  • Provide support and leadership when dealing with the sensitive exploration of issues of privacy and information-sharing in complex or risky situations, offering support and guidance in managing such dilemmas.

Advanced Level - Diversity

Social workers understand that diversity characterises and shapes human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. Diversity is multi-dimensional and includes race, disability, class, economic status, age, sexuality, gender and transgender, faith and belief. Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experience may include oppression, marginalisation and alienation as well as privilege, power and acclaim, and are able to challenge appropriately.

  • Promote positive approaches to diversity and identity in your area of responsibility, providing guidance and challenge as required. Contribute to and implement policy development and decision-making
  • Create and sustain an environment where people feel supported to challenge on issues of discrimination and oppression
  • Provide or seek out expert professional advice so that the law is complied with. Contribute to the development of relevant organisational and professional practices and procedures
  • Model and contribute to the development of best practice in use of power and authority within your sphere of influence. Provide challenge in situations where power is used inappropriately.

Advanced Level - Rights and Justice

Social workers recognise the fundamental principles of human rights and equality, and that these are protected in national and international law, conventions and policies. They ensure these principles underpin their practice. Social workers understand the importance of using and contributing to case law and applying these rights in their own practice. They understand the effects of oppression, discrimination and poverty.

  • Monitor, review and evaluate practice to ensure application of the principles of social justice, social inclusion and equality to decision-making. Contribute to policies and development opportunities to support these principles
  • Ensure that practice is compliant with the law through the provision of or access to expert professional social work advice. Challenge situations where the interpretation of the law seems neither fair nor proportionate
  • Model best practice, provide or seek out expert professional social work/legal advice, applying human and civil rights in complex situations where there are competing issues
  • Model and guide others on accessing appropriate opportunities that may enhance economic status. Advocate for the development of opportunities for people within your sphere of influence
  • Offer professional SW consultation and liaison to independent advocacy. Support others to identify when independent advocacy is appropriate, and advocate for necessary resources. Provide review and challenge as necessary.

Advanced Level - Knowledge

Social workers understand psychological, social, cultural, spiritual and physical influences on people; human development throughout the life span and the legal framework for practice. They apply this knowledge in their work with individuals, families and communities. They know and use theories and methods of social work practice.

The capitals in brackets indicate the capability pathways that apply: (PSWE) - Professional Social Work Educator, (ASWP) - Advanced Social Work Practitioner, (SWM) - Social Work Manager.

  • Encourage a culture of professional curiosity
  • Maintain a well developed understanding of knowledge relevant to your area of practice, and a confident self awareness of knowledge limits
  • Be able to access and make critical use of relevant knowledge from a variety of sources, and apply this knowledge in practice
  • Maintain a strong socio-cultural knowledge base, (including in relation to law, human development, social, psychological and spiritual issues) and apply confidently in practice
  • Use knowledge to hypothesise and make complex judgments in uncertain and ambiguous situations, supporting and challenging others to do the same
  • Enable and challenge others to develop their knowledge base and make knowledge informed judgments
  • Have an in-depth knowledge of adult learning and its application to practice. (PSWE)
  • Have an in-depth knowledge and understanding of holistic assessment processes and theory. (PSWE)
  • Have a good knowledge of team dynamics, resources, and the ability to maximise people and team potential. (SWM)
  • Develop and maintain expertise, informed by knowledge, in both established and emergent areas relevant to their field of practice. (ASWP)
  • Support others, through consultation and shadowing, to apply knowledge to practice. (ASWP)
  • Build and maintain a confident body of knowledge that informs team management practice and style. (SWM)

Advanced Level - Critical Reflection

Social workers are knowledgeable about and apply the principles of critical thinking and reasoned discernment. They identify, distinguish, evaluate and integrate multiple sources of knowledge and evidence. These include practice evidence, their own practice experience, service user and carer experience together with research-based, organisational, policy and legal knowledge. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity.

The capitals in brackets indicate the capability pathways that apply: (PSWE) - Professional Social Work Educator, (ASWP) - Advanced Social Work Practitioner, (SWM) - Social Work Manager.

  • Maintain an environment where critical reflection and analysis is valued and supported
  • Provide critical reflection, challenge and evidence-informed decision-making in complex situations. Support others in developing these capabilities, and finding their own solutions. (ASWP)
  • Model good practice and reflective supervision skills
  • Develop and maintain a system within which all social workers (including you) are able to access professional supervision from appropriately experienced social workers
  • Ensure protected time is available for professional social work supervision
  • Routinely provide professional social work opinion, based on clear rationale and advanced professional knowledge
  • Support and empower others to develop the confidence and skills to provide professional opinion.

Advanced Level - Intervention and Skills

Social workers engage with individuals, families, groups and communities, working alongside people to assess and intervene. They enable effective relationships and are effective communicators, using appropriate skills. Using their professional judgment, they employ a range of interventions: promoting independence, providing support and protection, taking preventative action and ensuring safety whilst balancing rights and risks. They understand and take account of differentials in power, and are able to use authority appropriately. They evaluate their own practice and the outcomes for those they work with.

The capitals in brackets indicate the capability pathways that apply: (PSWE) - Professional Social Work Educator, (ASWP) - Advanced Social Work Practitioner, (SWM) - Social Work Manager.

  • Model and promote a culture of clear communication, supporting the development of effective communication skills in others
  • Communicate effectively in highly charged, complex or challenging circumstance to a wide range of audiences for different purposes and at different levels, including public speaking
  • Model effective engagement with a wide range of people in challenging situations, and support others to develop and maintain effective engagement, including in situations of hostility and risk
  • Promote a culture which supports empathetic compassionate relationships with other professionals, people who use services, and those who care for them
  • Be able to gather, analyse and review complex and/or contradictory information quickly and effectively, using it to reach informed professional decisions
  • Support and encourage professional decision-making in others. Identify when more strategic/expert advice or decision-making is needed. (SWM/ASWP)
  • Maintain and provide expertise in specialist assessment and intervention, acting as a resource to others within the organisation, supporting social workers to develop.(ASWP/PSWE)
  • Engage in and facilitate research and evaluation of practice. (ASWP/PSWE)
  • Develop and maintain a culture that supports social/professional networks, for individuals, communities and professionals
  • Evaluate and analyse recording and the use of information systems. Use evidence gained to inform good practice and maintain a focus on positive outcomes for service users, families, carers and communities. (ASWP/SWM)
  • Advise, model, and support others to share information appropriately and in timely ways, including in complex situations where there are competing or contradictory rights involved
  • Manage organisational change, supporting others to do so in ways which maintain a focus on positive outcomes for people who use services, families, carers and communities. Model the appropriate use of authority across a range of situations, supporting others to understand and work with the authority inherent in their positions
  • Promote use of evidence and theory to support practice in complex and changing circumstance. (ASWP/PSWE)
  • Support effective interventions in the lives of people experiencing complex and challenging change. (ASWP/SWM)
  • Model effective assessment and management of risk in complex situations, across a range of situations, including positive risk taking approaches
  • Support and enable staff to have conversations with service users and others to manage risk decision-making themselves where possible
  • Be able to work with and contain the anxiety of others in relation to risk, ensuring that there is a positive balance between perceived risk and protection from harm when necessary. (ASWP/SWM)
  • Ensure risk assessment and management reflect current best practice and research developments, including supporting service users and others to manage their own risks where possible. (PSWE/ASWP)

Advanced Level - Contexts and Organisations

Social workers are informed about and pro-actively responsive to the challenges and opportunities that come with changing social contexts and constructs. They fulfil this responsibility in accordance with their professional values and ethics, both as individual professionals and as members of the organisation in which they work. They collaborate, inform and are informed by their work with others, inter-professionally and with communities.

  • Maintain an awareness of changes in national and local contexts and their impact on practice, and communicate this effectively within and outside of the organisation. Positively influence developments that affect social work practice
  • Provide professional leadership and facilitate collaboration within a multi-agency context as appropriate
  • Maintain a sophisticated knowledge of the law relevant to your area of practice, advise others and facilitate access to and dissemination of more specialist advice where necessary
  • Contribute to and provide professional leadership of organisational change and development, including the identification of gaps in service
  • Influence organisational development, pro-actively using feedback from your areas of responsibility
  • Address and oversee performance management issues that arise, supporting people to positively resolve difficulties where possible, taking action with HR/the regulator where necessary
  • Promote positive working relationships in and across teams, using strategies for collaboration and contribute to a supportive organisational culture
  • Develop and contribute to liaison across agencies at a local and regional level, maintain a collaborative working approach, resolving dilemmas actively where necessary.

Advanced Level - Professional Leadership

The social work profession evolves through the contribution of its members in activities such as practice research, supervision, assessment of practice, teaching and management. An individual’s contribution will gain influence when undertaken as part of a learning, practice-focused organisation. Learning may be facilitated with a wide range of people including social work colleagues, service users and carers, volunteers, foster carers and other professionals.

The capitals in brackets indicate the capability pathways that apply: (PSWE) - Professional Social Work Educator, (ASWP) - Advanced Social Work Practitioner, (SWM) - Social Work Manager.

  • Promote and develop professional leadership within your area of responsibility
  • Promote a culture of professional curiosity embracing research within your area of responsibility, encouraging the exploration of different cultures, concepts and ideas
  • Contribute to the identification, planning and meeting of staff development needs within the workplace, informed by the PCF
  • Take responsibility for ensuring individual and workplace practice is informed by and informs research and current professional knowledge
  • Promote, articulate and support a positive social work identity
  • Have regard to the requirements of the standards for Employers of Social Workers
  • Ensure systems are in place to provide high quality professional and line management supervision (as appropriate to the role), using critical reflection and a range of other supervisory techniques
  • Assure high quality professional supervision for all (including those providing supervision) within your area of responsibility
  • Provide professional, reflective supervision and support to others. (ASWP)
  • Be able to identify and develop potential within other staff
  • Understand concepts of holistic assessment of professional capability, and be able to apply to appraisal processes/performance reviews of social workers within your area of responsibility.

Strategic Level - Professionalism

Social workers are members of an internationally recognised profession, a title protected in UK law. Social workers demonstrate professional commitment by taking responsibility for their conduct, practice and learning, with support through supervision. As representatives of the social work profession they safeguard its reputation and are accountable to the professional regulator.

  • Be able to meet the requirements of the professional regulator
  • Model the social work role at a senior level, taking a strategic approach to representing and promoting the profession within and outside of the organisation
  • Model and use critical reflective skills in management, practice or organisational supervision settings to enhance your own, others and the organisation’s strategic outcomes
  • Model and demonstrate professionalism, ensuring professional social work standards are promoted and enhanced throughout the organisation
  • Identify and quantify the social work and other resources required to support the work of the organisation
  • Take responsibility for the implementation and evaluation of workload tools. Ensure the organisation’s workload is actively monitored and evaluated, taking action to promote positive solutions
  • Model the sophisticated use of self, and professional/personal boundaries in a range of complex situations, and ensure policies and procedures recognise or reflect this approach
  • Maintain awareness of own professional limitations, knowledge gaps and conflicts of interest and actively seek to address issues for self and others
  • Maintain a professional and strategic network of internal and external colleagues, with whom to seek and share advice, expertise and new developments in social work
  • Create and sustain an environment that promotes learning and practice development, facilitating research within the organisation and with strategic partners
  • Create and sustain a work environment that promotes health, safety and well-being of self and others across the organisation
  • Create and maintain a culture where concerns about practice are effectively dealt with, including reporting to the regulator as appropriate
  • Take responsibility to ensure that organisational procedures are relevant, reflect effective practice and contribute to better outcomes.

Strategic Level - Values and Ethics

Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making, including through partnership with people who use their services. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of their profession, its ethical standards and relevant law.

  • Provide leadership in the critical application of professional ethics to strategic decision-making, using a legal and human rights framework
  • Develop and promote an organisational culture which encourages reflection on the influence and impact of own or agency values on organisational culture and practice
  • Demonstrate confident leadership for the organisation in taking account of and arbitrating in complex ethical situations
  • Lead effective partnership working within and outside of the organisation, creating a culture that promotes meaningful participation of individuals, communities, families and carers. Ensure that the outcomes that service users and carers experience are the focus for review
  • Promote a culture where individuals and communities can exercise their rights to autonomy and self determination; ensuring this is balanced against the responsibility not to harm others or be harmed themselves
  • Lead on ensuring that policies and strategies concerning information sharing and privacy are informed by current legal and professional requirements concerning safeguarding, information sharing, confidentiality and data protection
  • Ensure the organisation is aware of, and responds to changes in legislation and guidance.

Strategic Level - Diversity

Social workers understand that diversity characterises and shapes human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. Diversity is multi-dimensional and includes race, disability, class, economic status, age, sexuality, gender and transgender, faith and belief. Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experience may include oppression, marginalisation and alienation as well as privilege, power and acclaim, and are able to challenge appropriately.

  • Lead and be accountable for strategic approaches to diversity and identity creating and embedding equality and diversity within the organisation
  • Create and sustain an organisational environment where people feel supported to challenge on issues of discrimination and oppression
  • Lead on ensuring that policies, practice and strategies concerning discrimination and oppression reflect the law and current best practice
  • Lead and model at a strategic level appropriate and effective use of power and authority. Provide challenge in situations where power is used inappropriately.

Strategic Level - Rights and Justice

Social workers recognise the fundamental principles of human rights and equality, and that these are protected in national and international law, conventions and policies. They ensure these principles underpin their practice. Social workers understand the importance of using and contributing to case law and applying these rights in their own practice. They understand the effects of oppression, discrimination and poverty.

The capitals in brackets indicate the capability pathways that apply: (SSWE) - Strategic Social Work Educator, (PSW) - Principal Social Worker, (SSWM) - Strategic Social Work Manager

  • Take responsibility for developing and sustaining a culture where the principles of social justice, social inclusion and equality are applied to strategic decision-making
  • Take strategic responsibility for ensuring that the service is compliant with the law, and secure the provision of expert advice, making judicious use of such advice. Create and sustain environments where people are enabled to provide effective challenge and ensure human rights are upheld
  • Secure expert advice in complex human and civil rights situations to ensure an appropriate and proportionate response by the organisation. Promote and contribute to policy and practice developments to support service improvement
  • Develop strategies (including regarding resources and commissioning) to promote social inclusion and access to opportunities which may enhance people’s economic status
  • Monitor and evaluate their effectiveness and impact, leading and informing new approaches. Take action to address and alleviate emerging issues, working pro-actively with partner organisations to achieve positive outcomes. (SSWM/PSW)
  • Create an environment that promotes partnership working with independent advocates. Ensure resources are available to support access to independent advocacy, in line with statutory duties and local need.

Strategic Level - Knowledge

Social workers understand psychological, social, cultural, spiritual and physical influences on people; human development throughout the life span and the legal framework for practice. They apply this knowledge in their work with individuals, families and communities. They know and use theories and methods of social work practice.

The capitals in brackets indicate the capability pathways that apply: (SSWE) - Strategic Social Work Educator, (PSW) - Principal Social Worker, (SSWM) - Strategic Social Work Manager

  • Encourage a culture of professional curiosity
  • Maintain a well developed understanding of knowledge relevant to your area of organisational practice, and a confident self awareness of knowledge limits
  • Access and make critical use of relevant knowledge from a variety of sources, and apply this knowledge in strategic settings
  • Continue to maintain and use a strong socio-cultural knowledge base (including in relation to law, human development, social, psychological and spiritual issues) to inform strategic thinking and decision-making
  • Be able to apply knowledge to hypothesise and make complex decisions in strategic situations
  • Ensure the organisation structure accommodates, though a range of approaches, appropriate resourcing for the development of and critical engagement with knowledge debates
  • Actively challenge structures and processes which inhibit knowledge development and debate
  • Ensure access to knowledge resources and relevant practice debates
  • Lead and promote the incorporation of adult learning into workforce development. Use knowledge of adult learning theories to lead the development of a learning organisation. (SSWE)
  • Identify and address knowledge gaps across the organisation. (SSWE)
  • Commission knowledge development of holistic assessment. (SSWE)
  • Ensure social work workforce strategies address and incorporate supporting the development of practice knowledge. (SSWE)
  • Have a good knowledge of organisational dynamics, resources, and the ability to maximise team and organisational potential. (SSWM)
  • Maintain a high level of expertise, informed by knowledge in both established and emergent areas relevant to their field of practice. (PSW)
  • Provide consultation that is knowledge informed to professional /strategic decision-making. (PSW/SSWM)
  • Maintain and model a confident body of knowledge that informs management practice and style. (SSWM)

Strategic Level - Critical Reflection

Social workers are knowledgeable about and apply the principles of critical thinking and reasoned discernment. They identify, distinguish, evaluate and integrate multiple sources of knowledge and evidence. These include practice evidence, their own practice experience, service user and carer experience together with research-based, organisational, policy and legal knowledge. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity.

The capitals in brackets indicate the capability pathways that apply: (SSWE) - Strategic Social Work Educator, (PSW) - Principal Social Worker, (SSWM) - Strategic Social Work Manager

  • Take responsibility for the creation and maintenance of an organisational environment within which critical reflection and analysis take place and are valued and supported
  • Promote and provide critical reflection, challenge and evidence-informed decision-making in complex situations. Support others in developing these capabilities, and finding their own solutions. (PSW)
  • Model good practice and reflective supervision skills
  • Take strategic responsibility for the development of a system of critical analysis and reflective professional supervision at all levels within the organisation, ensuring this is appropriately resourced, in line with the Standards for Employers. (SSWM/PSW)
  • Routinely provide professional social work opinion within a strategic context
  • Using evidence and practice knowledge, be the voice of professional social work opinion within strategic decision-making. (PSW)
  • Be responsible for ensuring that the value of social work professional knowledge and opinion influences good practice, service delivery and organisational strategy. (PSW)
  • Champion the development of empowered professional social work decision makers throughout the organisation.

Strategic Level - Intervention and Skills

Social workers engage with individuals, families, groups and communities, working alongside people to assess and intervene. They enable effective relationships and are effective communicators, using appropriate skills. Using their professional judgment, they employ a range of interventions: promoting independence, providing support and protection, taking preventative action and ensuring safety whilst balancing rights and risks. They understand and take account of differentials in power, and are able to use authority appropriately. They evaluate their own practice and the outcomes for those they work with.

The capitals in brackets indicate the capability pathways that apply: (SSWE) - Strategic Social Work Educator, (PSW) - Principal Social Worker, (SSWM) - Strategic Social Work Manager.

  • Model effective communication skills within a strategic context, creating the opportunity/environment where effective communication is promoted within the organisation
  • Communicate in an effective and competent manner in highly charged, complex or challenging circumstance in strategic settings, inside and outside the organisation
  • Ensure strategic communication is informed by current direct practice experience. (PSW)
  • Provide effective strategic leadership, support and model engagement in the most challenging of circumstances, including with partner agencies, stakeholders and other professionals
  • Create an ethos in the organisation where social workers are supported to engage positively with people in challenging circumstances
  • Maintain empathetic compassionate relationships with strategic leads, other professionals, people who use services and those who care for them
  • Be able to gather complex and/or contradictory information, analyse it from different perspectives as a strategic leader and professional social worker, and use it to inform organisational and professional decision-making
  • Support and enable others to use their own experience and expertise to analyse information and make informed professional decisions
  • Maintain and use expert assessment and intervention skills in complex practice situations, and support others to do so. Engage in and facilitate research and evaluation of practice. (PSW)
  • Develop a culture that supports and encourages engagement in research, as well as development and maintenance of expert intervention skills. (PSW/SSWE)
  • Create and maintain a culture of support for engagement with networks both within and outside of the organisation. Developing strategic engagement with a range of stakeholder groups
  • Strategically understand the interface between information systems and practice, and ensure systems support delivery of positive outcomes for people who use services, families, carers and communities. (PSW)
  • Take action to ensure information systems continue to be fit for practice
  • Have responsibility for advising and contributing to the organisation’s information governance system, and ensure implementation is congruent with social work practice and legal requirements
  • Lead change within and across organisations, ensuring that strategic decisions are informed by social work knowledge and practice, and the need to develop positive outcomes for service users, carers and communities
  • Model the appropriate use of authority across a range of complex and challenging situations, ensuring that systems are in place to support the appropriate use of professional authority by social workers within the organisation
  • Lead the development and use of evidence-informed risk assessment, which support both responsiveness and positive risk taking to improve outcomes for people who use services, families, carers and communities. (PSW)
  • Be able to work with and contain the anxiety of other people in complex and highly charged situations, ensuring that there is a proportionate response between perceived risk and protection from harm when necessary. (PSW/SSWM)
  • Lead and develop an organisational culture which is responsive to developing best practice and research around risk assessment and management, at all levels of the organisation. (PSW/SSWM)
  • Develop service user outcome focused evaluation of their experience of the social work interventions, such as safeguarding, and embed any learning into practice. (PSW/SSWM)

Strategic Level - Contexts and Organisations

Social workers are informed about and pro-actively responsive to the challenges and opportunities that come with changing social contexts and constructs. They fulfil this responsibility in accordance with their professional values and ethics, both as individual professionals and as members of the organisation in which they work. They collaborate, inform and are informed by their work with others, inter-professionally and with communities.

The capitals in brackets indicate the capability pathways that apply: (SSWE) - Strategic Social Work Educator, (PSW) - Principal Social Worker, (SSWM) - Strategic Social Work Manager.

  • Anticipate and provide strategic leadership for social workers and others, engaging locally, regionally and nationally, to positively influence developments that affect social work
  • Initiate and facilitate effective multi-agency partnership working, to drive improvements in performance and outcomes for people who use services, families, carers and communities
  • Maintain a sophisticated knowledge of the law relevant to your area of responsibility, using it to support strategic decision-making. Advise others and seek out specialist advice where necessary. Ensure social workers have access to legal advice and information where needed
  • Initiate, facilitate and enable organisational development at a local, regional and national level, providing professional leadership as needed
  • Lead the positive use of mechanisms for feedback about social work to inform organisational development
  • Ensure that a social work perspective informs organisational decision-making. (PSW)
  • Develop and maintain a strategic plan to oversee performance management themes that arise, supporting positive resolutions and taking action with HR/the regulator where necessary
  • Promote positive working relationships across the organisation, using strategies to support collaboration and a supportive organisational culture
  • Initiate, facilitate and lead liaison across agencies at a local, regional and national level, maintain a collaborative working approach, resolving intractable dilemmas where necessary.

Strategic Level - Professional Leadership

The social work profession evolves through the contribution of its members in activities such as practice research, supervision, assessment of practice, teaching and management. An individual’s contribution will gain influence when undertaken as part of a learning, practice-focused organisation. Learning may be facilitated with a wide range of people including social work colleagues, service users and carers, volunteers, foster carers and other professionals.

  • Model professional social work leadership, and provide opportunities to support others’ development
  • Lead a culture of professional curiosity within the organisation, embracing research and encouraging the exploration of different cultures, concepts and ideas
  • Ensure there is appropriate provision to identify, plan for, and meet staff development needs within the organisation so that workforce planning and appraisal are informed by the PCF
  • Create opportunities and systems for current practice to inform and be informed by research and current professional knowledge
  • Lead, articulate and promote a positive social work identity which actively seeks and respects the contributions and views of all
  • Drive improvement in line with the Standards for Employers of Social Workers
  • Create and promote a culture of high quality supervision which covers practice, organisational and management issues (as appropriate to the role) promoting critical reflection throughout the organisation
  • Ensure systems are in place to monitor effectiveness
  • Ensure effective, sufficient and appropriate supervision is embedded across the organisation and that a strategy is in place to ensure that professional supervisors are trained and skilled in a range of approaches
  • Lead a culture of talent identification and development
  • Understand concepts of holistic assessment of professional capability, and be able to apply to appraisal processes/performance reviews of social workers within your area of responsibility.